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Mayor Bill De Blasio Failed To Equip New York For Coronavirus Crisis.

Seth Baron at City Journal explains how DiBlasio and NYC agencies focused so much of their efforts on climate change related disasters that they forgot to focus on the likely scenario of a flu-like pandemic. So while the city spent millions on education campaigns and billion of flood defenses related to a hurricane disaster, when COVID-19 hit it was short on basic supplies like ventilators, masks, face guards and hand sanitizer.

New York is the nation’s largest and richest city, and it’s worth asking why it found itself in such short supply of basic goods, especially after so much time and energy was spent on preparedness and resiliency. The city published multiple studies about the likelihood of an epidemic that could flood emergency rooms and participated in a rolling “Pandemic Accord Continuity Exercise Series” with FEMA from 2013 through 2015. The NYC Health + Hospitals Corporation, the largest public hospital organization in the country, has a dedicated Simulation Center that ran a “SARS Pandemic Response Simulation” at Kings County Hospital in 2019.

Source: Mayor Bill De Blasio Failed To Equip New York For Coronavirus Crisis.

That MIT Study About the Subway Causing COVID Spread is Crap

An MIT Study claiming that NYC’s subway system is a major reason why the city has become the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic is under fire. This article in StreetsBlog by Alon Levy attacks it from many different angles, including:

  • Arguing other cities with subway systems aren’t seeing the type of pandemic rise as NYC.
  • The paper’s core arguments come from misinterpreted and misrepresented data.
  • Even if the paper’s premise were correct, Manhattan’s infection data would undermine the argument.

But when it comes to hard evidence, the paper makes two quantitative claims. The first is in figure 3: Manhattan had both the least increase in infections in the 3/13-4/7 period, equivalent to a doubling period of 20 days whereas the other boroughs ranged between 9.5 and 14, and also the largest decrease in subway entries in the 3/2-16 period, 65 percent whereas the other boroughs ranged between 33 percent and 56 percent.

The second is a series of maps showing per capita infection levels by ZIP code, similar to the one here. The paper also overlays a partial subway map and asserts that the map shows that there is correlation of infection rates along specific subway routes, for example the 7, as people spread the disease along the line.

Neither is even remotely correct.

Read the article at its source: That MIT Study About the Subway Causing COVID Spread is Crap

Your Neighborhood Might Be a Coronavirus Hot Spot, but New York City Refuses to Release the Data

Intrepid ProPublica muckracker Justin Elliott examines the lack of data New York City is releasing about Coronavirus cases. His main complaint is that NYC isn’t releasing neighborhood level data, a practice many other cities are doing including Los Angeles, Singapore, Soeul and many more.

The lack of detailed information makes it difficult for medical workers, journalists and the public to establish whether particular communities in the city are being harder hit and to get beyond anecdotal accounts of which of the city’s roughly 60 hospitals are already overwhelmed.

Dr. Michael Augenbraun, director of the infectious diseases division at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in central Brooklyn, said that while he knows the city has its hands full, the data could be useful for doctors. “Everyone is struggling to make sense of this evolving picture,” he said. “I think it would be useful to us in the hospitals to get a detailed situational appraisal, to know how much of the burden we are confronting.”

Source: Your Neighborhood Might Be a Coronavirus Hot Spot, but New York City Refuses to Release the Data — ProPublica