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March

2020

Cuomo on possible NY quarantine: ‘I don’t think it’s legal’

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo goes on CNN to give his opinion of Trump’s idea to quaratine the New York metropolitan area due to fears of spread of Coronavirus.

“It would be chaos and mayhem,” Cuomo told CNN’s Ana Cabrera. “It’s totally opposite everything he’s been saying. I don’t think it is plausible. I don’t think it is legal.”

“This would be a federal declaration of war on states,” Cuomo said, adding that he doesn’t think the President is looking to start a war with states.

Source: Cuomo on possible NY quarantine: ‘I don’t think it’s legal’ – CNNPolitics

Your Neighborhood Might Be a Coronavirus Hot Spot, but New York City Refuses to Release the Data

Intrepid ProPublica muckracker Justin Elliott examines the lack of data New York City is releasing about Coronavirus cases. His main complaint is that NYC isn’t releasing neighborhood level data, a practice many other cities are doing including Los Angeles, Singapore, Soeul and many more.

The lack of detailed information makes it difficult for medical workers, journalists and the public to establish whether particular communities in the city are being harder hit and to get beyond anecdotal accounts of which of the city’s roughly 60 hospitals are already overwhelmed.

Dr. Michael Augenbraun, director of the infectious diseases division at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in central Brooklyn, said that while he knows the city has its hands full, the data could be useful for doctors. “Everyone is struggling to make sense of this evolving picture,” he said. “I think it would be useful to us in the hospitals to get a detailed situational appraisal, to know how much of the burden we are confronting.”

Source: Your Neighborhood Might Be a Coronavirus Hot Spot, but New York City Refuses to Release the Data — ProPublica

MIT E-VENT | Emergency ventilator design toolbox

This MIT project is developing open source plans for a ventilator in response to the Coronavirus panedemic. A lack of ventilators within the US and globally could result in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people who need them to stay alive during the more severe phases of the disease. 

Almost every bed in a hospital has a manual resuscitator (Ambu-Bag) nearby, available in the event of a rapid response or code where healthcare workers maintain oxygenation by squeezing the bag. Automating this appears to be the simplest strategy that satisfies the need for low-cost mechanical ventilation, with the ability to be rapidly manufactured in large quantities. However, doing this safely is not trivial.

Source: MIT E-VENT | Emergency ventilator design toolbox

Feeling Powerless About Coronavirus? Join a Mutual-Aid Network

New York Times opinion writer Charlie Warzel profiles a mutual aid group in Massachusetts organized in response to the Coronavirus pandemic, explaining the general concepts and tells a few stories about why these networks are so powerful.

There’s also a selfish component to joining a mutual-aid network: In a moment of deep uncertainty and anxiety, helping those in need is one of the few pure pleasures one can still partake in while social distancing. If you’re feeling powerless these days and have the means, look up your local mutual-aid network. Plug into the organizing that’s happening. If you don’t have the means to donate, share the resource documents or email or donation address with your neighbors. A quarantine is the perfect time to get (virtually) close to your community.

Source: Opinion | Feeling Powerless About Coronavirus? Join a Mutual-Aid Network – The New York Times

Civic Technology Can Help Stop a Pandemic

Tech philosopher Jaron Lanier explains in Foreign Affairs how the small and young but mighty democratic nation of Taiwan utilized civic technology to rapidly prototype and build apps that enables their society to organize on of the world’s most effective responses to COVID-19. 

Taiwan’s success has rested on a fusion of technology, activism, and civic participation. A small but technologically cutting-edge democracy, living in the shadow of the superpower across the strait, Taiwan has in recent years developed one of the world’s most vibrant political cultures by making technology work to democracy’s advantage rather than detriment. This culture of civic technology has proved to be the country’s strongest immune response to the new coronavirus.

Read the article: Civic Technology Can Help Stop a Pandemic